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  • Hospital Security Officers Right to Join a Hospital Security Union

    Employees have the right to unionize, to join together to advance their interests as employees, and to refrain from such activity. It is unlawful for an employer to interfere with, restrain, or coerce employees in the exercise of their rights. For example, employers may not respond to a union organizing drive by threatening, interrogating, or spying on pro-union employees, or by promising benefits if they forget about the union. Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (the Act) guarantees employees "the right to self-organization, to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively through representatives of their own choosing, and to engage in other concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection," as well as the right "to refrain from any or all such activities." Section 8(a)(1) of the Act makes it an unfair labor practice for an employer "to interfere with, restrain, or coerce employees in the exercise of the rights guaranteed in Section 7" of the Act. For example, you may not Threaten employees with adverse consequences, such as closing the workplace, loss of benefits, or more onerous working conditions, if they support a union, engage in union activity, or select a union to represent them. Threaten employees with adverse consequences if they engage in protected, concerted activity. (Activity is "concerted" if it is engaged in with or on the authority of other employees, not solely by and on behalf of the employee himself. It includes circumstances where a single employee seeks to initiate, induce, or prepare for group action, as well as where an employee brings a group complaint to the attention of management. Activity is "protected" if it concerns employees' interests as employees. An employee engaged in otherwise protected, concerted activity may lose the Act's protection through misconduct.) Promise employees benefits if they reject the union. Imply a promise of benefits by soliciting grievances from employees during a union organizing campaign. (However, if you regularly solicited employee grievances before the campaign began, you may continue that practice unchanged.) Confer benefits on employees during a union organizing campaign to induce employees to vote against the union. Withhold changes in wages or benefits during a union organizing campaign that would have been made had the union not been on the scene, unless you make clear to employees that the change will occur whether or not they select the union, and that your sole purpose in postponing the change is to avoid any appearance of trying to influence the outcome of the election. Coercively question employees about their own or coworkers' union activities or sympathies. (Whether questioning is coercive and therefore unlawful depends on the relevant circumstances, including who asks the questions, where, and how; what information is sought; whether the questioned employee is an open and active union supporter; and whether the questioning occurs in a context of other unfair labor practices.) Prohibit employees from talking about the union during working time, if you permit them to talk about other non-work-related subjects. Poll your employees to determine the extent of their support for a union, unless you comply with certain safeguards. You must not have engaged in unfair labor practices or otherwise created a coercive atmosphere. In addition, you must (1) communicate to employees that the purpose of the poll is to determine whether the union enjoys majority support (and that must, in truth, be your purpose); (2) give employees assurances against reprisal; and (3) conduct the poll by secret ballot. Spy on employees' union activities. ("Spying" means doing something out of the ordinary to observe the activity. Seeing open union activity in workplace areas frequented by supervisors is not "spying.") Create the impression that you are spying on employees' union activities. Photograph or videotape employees engaged in peaceful union or other protected activities. Solicit individual employees to appear in a campaign video. Promulgate, maintain, or enforce work rules that reasonably tend to inhibit employees from exercising their rights under the Act. Deny off-duty employees access to outside nonworking areas of your property, unless business reasons justify it. Prohibit employees from wearing union buttons, t-shirts, and other union insignia unless special circumstances warrant. Convey the message that selecting a union would be futile. Discipline or discharge a union-represented employee for refusing to submit, without a representative, to an investigatory interview the employee reasonably believes may result in discipline. Interview employees to prepare your defense in an unfair labor practice case, unless you provide certain assurances. You must communicate to the employee the purpose of the questioning, assure him against reprisals, and obtain his voluntary participation. Questioning must occur in a context free from employer hostility to union organization and must not itself be coercive. And questioning must not go beyond what is needful to achieve its legitimate purpose. That is, you may not pry into other union matters, elicit information concerning the employee's subjective state of mind, or otherwise interfere with employee rights under the Act. Initiate, solicit employees to sign, or lend more than minimal support to or approval of a decertification or union-disaffection petition. Discharge, constructively discharge, suspend, layoff, fail to recall from layoff, demote, discipline, or take any other adverse action against employees because of their protected, concerted activities. Source: National Labor Relations Board NLRB Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510

  • What are the job duties of a Hospital Security Officer?

    What are the job duties of a Hospital Security Officer? Hospitals are places where patients go to obtain services to fix them physically and emotionally. They have to be safe. A hospital security officer makes sure of this. His or her main work is to ensure that assigned duties are performed so that hospital property and people within remain safe from external threats. As a hospital security officer, you protect staff, patients, and visitors and ensure that all hospital property is secure. Your duties are to patrol the building and its grounds, monitor all activity in and out of the hospital, and endeavor to prevent vandalism, theft, fire, and disturbances within the facility. You frequently report to your manager or other security personnel about what you have observed on your rounds. You must be on the lookout for all sorts of issues at the hospital, including maintenance issues, which may compromise people’s safety or the integrity of the building. ​ What are the Training Requirements for a Hospital Security Officer? Typically, a hospital security officer will undergo a training program prior to assuming job duties. It is not unusual for him or her to have other experience in the areas of security or police work. For example, a security guard may also be a current or former police officer. The type of training program required to work hospital security will typically vary by jurisdiction and the standards of both the training course provider and the security officer's employer. A hospital may choose to hire its own security staff or may contract with an outside staffing agency to provide and manage a security team. Some jurisdictions require private security officers to be licensed through a government agency. ​ What Are the Requirements to Become a Hospital Security Officer? The qualifications needed to become a hospital security guard include a high school diploma and basic security officer training. Additional qualifications include a clean driving record, a valid driver’s license, and a cleared background check. Basic security officer training prepares you to understand and handle a variety of things pertinent to your job, such as legal responsibilities, weapon safety, and observational skills. Some courses specifically focus on security officers interested in work at medical facilities. Hospital Security Officer Responsibilities Examples of Hospital Security Officer Duties ​ The actual responsibilities and duties of a hospital security officer will vary depending the hospital where the guard works as well as his or her experience level. Some areas of the hospital may be under more extreme security measures than others. For example, many hospitals take special security precautions in maternity wards so as to prevent the abduction of newborn infants. Areas of the hospital in which drugs or other types of expensive equipment are stored may also benefit from a stronger security presence. Patrols assigned facility, on foot, to guard and protect persons and property against vandalism, arson, prowlers and other conditions that could lead to loss of life or property. Inspects buildings for open doors or windows, damage, safety hazards, and faulty mechanical problems. Responds to emergency radio calls including accidents, bomb threats, fires and hostage situations. Investigates suspected crimes on the premises including larcenies and stolen articles. Assists the general public, visitors and employees by answering questions, locating offices and escorting to specific locations. Reports all pertinent data of action taken during a shift by maintaining a written log and orally giving information to shift supervisor. Restrains and detains persons who damage property and molest or harass persons for arrest by police authority. Operates two way communication system to monitor and provide assistance for routine activities and as contact for the medical examiner and investigators. Performs related work as required. ​ Knowledge Skills and Abilities of a Hospital Security Officer ​ Key skills for Hospital Security Officers Assertiveness. The ability to think on your feet. The ability to remain calm in challenging or dangerous situations. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills, including the ability to listen. Confidence working with people from all backgrounds. Teamworking skills. Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510

  • Hospital Security Officers right to communicate with other Officers about Your wages @ Workplace

    Under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act), employees have the right to communicate with other employees at their workplace about their wages. Wages are a vital term and condition of employment, and discussions of wages are often preliminary to organizing or other actions for mutual aid or protection. Under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act), employees have the right to communicate with other employees at their workplace about their wages. Wages are a vital term and condition of employment, and discussions of wages are often preliminary to organizing or other actions for mutual aid or protection. If you are an employee covered by the Act, you may discuss wages in face-to-face conversations and written messages. When using electronic communications, like social media, keep in mind that your employer may have policies against using their equipment. However, policies that specifically prohibit the discussion of wages are unlawful. You may have discussions about wages when not at work, when you are on break, and even during work if employees are permitted to have other non-work conversations. You have these rights whether or not you are represented by a union. Protected conversations about wages may take on many forms, including having conversations about how much you and your colleagues and managers make, presenting joint requests concerning pay to your employer; organizing a union to raise your wages; approaching an outside union for help in bargaining with your employer over pay; and approaching the National Labor Relations Board for more information on your rights under the NLRA. In addition, you have the right to discuss and engage in outside activity with other employees concerning public issues that clearly may affect your wages – for example, minimum wage or right-to-work laws. You may also discuss supporting employees who work elsewhere. “Under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act), employees have the right to communicate with other employees at their workplace about their wages. Wages are a vital term and condition of employment, and discussions of wages are often preliminary to organizing or other actions for mutual aid or protection. You also have the right not to engage in conversations or communications about your wages. When you and another employee have a conversation or communication about your pay, it is unlawful for your employer to punish or retaliate against you in any way for having that conversation. It is also unlawful for your employer to interrogate you about the conversation, threaten you for having it, or put you under surveillance for such conversations. Additionally, it is unlawful for the employer to have a work rule, policy, or hiring agreement that prohibits employees from discussing their wages with each other or that requires you to get the employer’s permission to have such discussions. If your employer does any of these things, a charge may be filed against the employer with the NLRB. If you have any questions about your rights under the National Labor Relations Act, please call the NLRB at 1-844-762-6572. Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510

  • Hospital Security Officers Rights During a Union Organizing Campaign

    Hospital Security Officers Rights to Form a Hospital Security Union You have the right to organize a Hospital Security Union to negotiate with your employer over your terms and conditions of employment. This includes your right to distribute union literature, wear union buttons t-shirts, or other insignia (except in unusual "special circumstances"), solicit coworkers to sign union authorization cards, and discuss the union with coworkers. Supervisors and managers cannot spy on you (or make it appear that they are doing so), coercively question you, threaten you or bribe you regarding your union activity or the union activities of your co-workers. You can't be fired, disciplined, demoted, or penalized in any way for engaging in these activities. Working time is for work, so your employer may maintain and enforce non-discriminatory rules limiting solicitation and distribution, except that your employer cannot prohibit you from talking about or soliciting for a union during non-work time, such as before or after work or during break times; or from distributing union literature during non-work time, in non-work areas, such as parking lots or break rooms. Also, restrictions on your efforts to communicate with co-workers cannot be discriminatory. For example, your employer cannot prohibit you from talking about the union during working time if it permits you to talk about other non-work-related matters during working time. Your Right to Form a Hospital Security Union Not represented by a hospital security union, but want to be? If a majority of workers wants to form a union, they can select a union in one of two ways: If at least 30% of workers sign cards or a petition saying they want a union, the NLRB will conduct an election. If a majority of those who vote choose the union, the NLRB will certify the union as your representative for collective bargaining. An election is not the only way a union can become your representative. Your employer may voluntarily recognize a union based on evidence - typically signed union-authorization cards - that a majority of employees want it to represent them. Once a union has been certified or recognized, the employer is required to bargain over your terms and conditions of employment with your union representative. Special rules apply in the construction industry. Right to refrain Federal law protects your right to decline to participate in union organizing or concerted activity, and to campaign against a union during an organizing campaign. Hospital Strikes Pickets and Protest All employees - union or not - have the right to participate in a protected strike, picket or protest. You have a right to strike, picket, and protest regarding work-related issues, but there are limitations and qualifications on the exercise of that right. Your right to engage in these activities depends on the object or purpose of the action, on its timing, or on the conduct of those involved. (For more about unprotected strikes, see the "I am represented by a union" and "union rights and responsibilities" sections of this app.) Violence or other serious misconduct, such as destruction of property, is not protected. Concerted activity Federal law protects employees engaged in union activity, but that's only part of the story. Even if you're not represented by a union - even if you have zero interest in having a union - the National Labor Relations Act protects your right to band together with coworkers to improve your lives at work. You have the right to act with coworkers to address work-related issues in many ways. Examples include: talking with one or more co-workers about your wages and benefits or other working conditions, circulating a petition asking for better hours, participating in a concerted refusal to work in unsafe conditions, and joining with coworkers to talk directly to your employer, to a government agency, or to the media about problems in your workplace. Your employer cannot discharge, discipline, or threaten you for, or coercively question you about, this "protected concerted" activity. However, you can lose protection by saying things about your employer that are egregiously offensive or knowingly and maliciously false, or by publicly disparaging your employer's products or services without relating your complaints to any labor controversy. Social media Even if you are not represented by a union, federal law gives you the right to band together with coworkers to improve your lives at work - including joining together in cyberspace, such as on Facebook. Using social media can be a form of "protected concerted" activity. You have the right to address work-related issues and share information about pay, benefits, and working conditions with coworkers on Facebook, YouTube, and other social media. But just individually griping about some aspect of work is not "concerted activity": what you say must have some relation to group action, or seek to initiate, induce, or prepare for group action, or bring a group complaint to the attention of management. How Hospital Security Officers Can Enforce Your Rights under NLRA If you believe your rights or the rights of others have been violated, you should contact the National Labor Relations Board promptly to protect your rights, generally within six months of the unlawful activity. You may make inquiries of the NLRB without your employer or a union, or anyone else being informed of the inquiry. A charge against an employer or union must be filed to initiate an investigation; charges may be filed by any person and need not be filed by the employee directly affected by the violations. Employees should seek assistance from the nearest Regional NLRB office, which can be found by clicking "Contact NLRB" above. It is illegal for an employer or union to retaliate against employees for filing charges or participating in NLRB investigation or proceedings. If the NLRB determines that your rights have been violated by an employer or a union, you may be awarded appropriate remedial relief. For example, if an employer has unlawfully fired an employee, the NLRB may order the employer to rehire the employee and to pay the employee lost wages and benefits. Likewise, if a union's unlawful conduct has caused an employee to lose a job, the NLRB may order the union to seek the employee's reinstatement and to make the employee whole financially. In all cases, the NLRB seeks to undo as much as possible the effects of whatever unlawful conduct has occurred, including by ordering the employer or union to stop violating the law and to post a remedial notice informing employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act. Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510

  • Union Rights for Hospital Security Officers

    Hospital Security Officer Rights to Join a Hospital Security Union Employees covered by the National Labor Relations Act are afforded certain rights to join together to improve their wages and working conditions, with or without a union. Union Activity Employees have the right to attempt to form a union where none currently exists, or to decertify a union that has lost the support of employees. Examples of employee rights include: Forming, or attempting to form, a union in your workplace; Joining a union whether the union is recognized by your employer or not; Assisting a union in organizing your fellow employees; Refusing to do any or all of these things. To be fairly represented by a union Hospital Security Officer Employees Rights “ Employees covered by the National Labor Relations Act are afforded certain rights to join together to improve their wages and working conditions, with or without a union.” Activity Outside a Union Employees who are not represented by a union also have rights under the NLRA. Specifically, the National Labor Relations Board protects the rights of employees to engage in “concerted activity”, which is when two or more employees take action for their mutual aid or protection regarding terms and conditions of employment. A single employee may also engage in protected concerted activity if he or she is acting on the authority of other employees, bringing group complaints to the employer’s attention, trying to induce group action, or seeking to prepare for group action. A few examples of protected concerted activities are: Two or more employees addressing their employer about improving their pay. Two or more employees discussing work-related issues beyond pay, such as safety concerns, with each other. An employee speaking to an employer on behalf of one or more co-workers about improving workplace conditions. Who is covered? Most employees in the private sector are covered by the NLRA. However, the Act specifically excludes individuals who are: employed by Federal, state, or local government employed as agricultural laborers employed in the domestic service of any person or family in a home employed by a parent or spouse employed as an independent contractor employed as a supervisor (supervisors who have been discriminated against for refusing to violate the NLRA may be covered) employed by an employer subject to the Railway Labor Act, such as railroads and airlines employed by any other person who is not an employer as defined in the NLRA Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510

  • Weingarten Rights Union Rights for Hospital Security Officers

    WEINGARTEN RIGHTS - UNION REPRESENTATION DURING INVESTIGATORY INTERVIEWS A VITAL FUNCTION of a steward is to prevent management from coercing employees into confessions of misconduct. This is especially important when a worker is questioned by a supervisor experienced in interrogation techniques. The NLRA’s protection of concerted activity includes the right to request assistance from union representatives during investigatory interviews. This was declared by the Supreme Court in 1975 in NLRB v. J. Weingarten, Inc. The rights announced by the Court have become known as Weingarten rights. Unions should educate their members about the advantages of having a steward present at an investigatory interview. These include the ability of the steward to: • serve as a witness to prevent a supervisor from giving a false account of the conversation; • object to intimidation tactics or confusing questions; • help an employee to avoid making fatal admissions; • advise an employee, when appropriate, against denying everything, thereby giving the appearance of dishonesty and guilt; • warn an employee against losing his or her temper; • discourage an employee from informing on others; and • raise extenuating factors. WHAT IS AN INVESTIGATORY INTERVIEW? Weingarten rights apply only during investigatory interviews. An investigatory interview occurs when: (1) management questions an employee to obtain information; and (2) the employee has a reasonable belief that discipline or other adverse consequences may result. For example, an employee questioned about an accident would be justified in fearing that she might be blamed for it. An employee questioned about poor work would have a reasonable fear of disciplinary action if he should admit to making errors. Shop-floor conversation. Not every discussion with management is an investigatory interview. For instance, a supervisor may speak with an employee about the proper way to do a job. The supervisor may even ask questions. But because the likelihood of discipline is remote, the conversation is not an investigatory interview. A shop-floor conversation can change its character, however. If the supervisor’s attitude becomes hostile and the meeting turns into an investigatory interview the employee is entitled to representation. Disciplinary announcement. When a supervisor calls an employee to the office to announce a warning or other discipline, is this an investigatory interview? The NLRB says no, because the supervisor is merely informing the employee of an already-made decision. Unless the supervisor asks questions about the employee’s conduct, the meeting is not investigatory. EMPLOYEE RIGHTS Under the Supreme Court’s Weingarten decision, the following rules apply to investigatory interviews: • The employee can request union representation before or at any time during the interview. • When an employee asks for representation, the employer must choose from among three options: 1. Grant the request and delay questioning until the union representative arrives; 2. Deny the request and end the interview immediately; or 3. Give the employee a choice of: (a) having the interview without representation or (b) ending the interview. • If the employer denies the request for union representation and continues the meeting, the employee can refuse to answer questions. ​ HOSPITAL SECURITY OFFICER STEWARD RIGHTS Employers sometimes assert that the only function of a steward at an investigatory interview is to observe the discussion; in other words, to be a silent witness. This is incorrect. The steward must be allowed to advise and assist the employee in presenting the facts. When the steward arrives at the meeting: • The supervisor or manager must inform the steward of the subject matter of the interview: in other words, the type of misconduct being investigated. • The steward must be allowed to have a private meeting with the employee before questioning begins. • The steward can speak during the interview, but cannot insist that the interview be ended. • The steward can object to a confusing question and can request that the question be clarified so that the employee understands what is being asked. • The steward can advise the employee not to answer questions that are abusive, misleading, badgering, or harassing. • When the questioning ends, the steward can provide information to justify the employee’s conduct. EDUCATING MEMBERS Employees sometime confuse Weingarten rights with Miranda rights. Under the Supreme Court’s Miranda decision, police who question criminal suspects in custody must notify them of their right to have a lawyer present. The Supreme Court did not impose a similar requirement in Weingarten. An employer does not have to inform an employee that he or she has a right to union representation. Unions should explain Weingarten rights to members in newsletters and at union meetings. Consider distributing wallet-sized cards such as the following: NLRB CHARGES An employer’s failure to comply with a worker’s request for union representation, or a violation of any other Weingarten right, is an unfair labor practice. Unless a grievance is pending on the matter, the NLRB does not defer Weingarten charges. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS STEWARD’S REQUEST Q. If I see a worker being questioned in a supervisor’s office, can I ask to be admitted? A. Yes. A steward has a right to insist on admission to a meeting that appears to be a Weingarten interview. If the interview is investigatory, the employee must be allowed to indicate whether he or she desires the steward’s presence. COERCION Q. An employee, summoned to a meeting with her supervisor, asked for her steward. The supervisor said, “You can request your steward, but if you do, I will have to bring in the plant manager and you know how temperamental she is. If we can keep it at this level, things will be better for you.” Is this a Weingarten violation? A. Yes. The supervisor is raising the specter of increased discipline to coerce an employee into abandoning her Weingarten rights. CAN EMPLOYEE REFUSE TO GO TO MEETING? Q. A supervisor told an employee to report to the personnel office for a “talk” about his attendance. The employee asked to see his steward but the supervisor said no. Can the employee refuse to go to the office without seeing his steward first? A. No. Weingarten rights do not arise until an investigatory interview actually begins. The employee must make a request for representation to the person conducting the interview.207 An employee can only refuse to go to a meeting if a supervisor makes clear in advance that union representation will be denied at the interview. MEDICAL EXAMINATION Q. Our employer requires medical examinations when workers return from medical leaves. Can an employee insist on a steward during the examination? A. No. A run-of-the-mill medical examination is not an investigatory interview. LIE DETECTOR TEST Q. Do Weingarten rights apply to polygraph tests? A. Yes. An employee has a right to union assistance during the pre-examination interview and the test itself. SOBRIETY TEST Q. If management asks an employee if he will submit to a test for alcohol, does Weingarten apply? A. Yes. The employee must be allowed to consult with a union representative to decide whether or not to take the test. LOCKER SEARCH Q. If a guard orders an employee to open a locker, can the employee insist on a steward being present? A. No. A locker search is not an investigatory interview. COUNSELING SESSION Q. An employee was given a written warning for poor attendance and told she must participate in counseling with the human relations department. Does she have a right to a union steward at the counseling sessions? A. This depends. If notes from the sessions are kept in the employee’s permanent record, or if other employees have been disciplined for what they said at counseling sessions, an employee’s request for a steward would come under Weingarten. But if management gives a firm assurance that the meetings will not be used for discipline, and promises that the conversations will remain confidential, Weingarten rights would probably not apply. PRIVATE ATTORNEY Q. Can a worker insist on a private attorney before answering questions at an investigatory interview? A. No. Weingarten only guarantees the presence of a union representative. TELEPHONE INTERVIEW Q. Over the weekend, a supervisor called a worker’s home to ask about missing tools. Did the worker have to answer the questions? A. No. Weingarten applies to telephone interviews. An employee who fears discipline can refuse to answer questions until the employee has a chance to consult with a union representative. STEWARD OUT SICK Q. If a worker’s steward is out sick, can the worker insist that a Weingarten interview be delayed until the steward returns? A. Usually, no. Management does not have to delay an investigation if another union representative is available to assist the employee. INTERROGATION OF A STEWARD Q. If a steward is called in by supervision to discuss her work, can she insist on the presence of another steward? A. Yes. Stewards have the same rights to assistance as other employees. SHOP MEETING Q. When management calls a meeting to go over work rules, do employees have a right to demand a union representative? A. No. Weingarten rights do not arise unless management asks questions of an investigatory nature. REMEDIES Q. If management rejects a worker’s request for union assistance at an investigatory interview, induces him to confess to wrongdoing, and fires him, will the NLRB order the worker reinstated because of the Weingarten violation? A. No. The NLRB considers reinstatement to be an unwarranted “windfall” for an employee who confesses to serious misconduct. The usual Weingarten remedy is a bulletin-board posting in which the employer acknowledges that it violated the Weingarten rules and promises to obey them in the future. NOTE: The remedy is different when an employee is discharged for requesting a steward or refusing to answer questions without one. In such cases, the NLRB orders reinstatement with back pay. A make-whole remedy is also imposed if an employee is demoted, transferred, or loses privileges because of a request for union representation. RECORDING THE INTERVIEW Q. Can a supervisor tape record an investigatory interview? A. This depends. The Weingarten decision itself does not forbid an employer from tape recording an investigatory interview. But, if this represents a new policy on the part of the employer, the steward can object on the grounds that the union did not receive prior notice and an opportunity to bargain. PARTICULAR REPRESENTATIVE? Q. If an employee asks to be represented by her chief steward instead of her departmental steward, must management comply? A. Usually, yes. If two representatives are equally available, an employee’s request for a particular representative must be honored. QUESTIONS ABOUT OTHERS Q. If a worker is summoned to a meeting and asked about the role of other employees in illegal activities, can he insist on assistance from a union representative? A. Yes. Although the employee may not be involved in wrongdoing himself, he risks discipline if he refuses to inform on others or admits that he was aware of illegal activities. Because what he says at the meeting could get him into trouble, he is entitled to union representation. OBSTRUCTION Q. The company is interviewing employees about drug use in the plant. If I tell my people not to answer questions, could management go after me? A. Yes. A union representative may not obstruct a legitimate investigation into employee misconduct. If management learns of such orders, you could be disciplined. NLRB v. J. Weingarten, Inc. 420 U.S. 251, 88 LRRM 2689 (U.S. Sup. Ct. 1975). Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510

  • Hospital Security Officer Code of Ethics

    THE HOSPITAL SECURITY OFFICER CODE OF ETHICS Ethics and professionalism go hand in hand. Hospital Security Officers are entrusted with the safety of lives and property. They are often a company’s first line ambassadors to the public, and are responsible for enforcing safety and integrity rules in the work place. The job requires the highest levels of integrity, honor, and discretion—ethics. It is the essence of a Hospital Security Officers position that conduct be at the highest levels of professionalism and integrity. This is simply expected of Hospital Security Officers; anything else is unacceptable. Simply stated if you can’t trust the people who are responsible for protecting lives and property to act ethically, who can you trust? New York State has adopted a code of ethics for Hospital Security Officers. The code of ethics formalizes the idea—and rule—that there are measurable standards of conduct expected from everyone who holds a Security Officer position. Code of Ethics defined The code of ethics is a statement that incorporates moral and ethical principles and philosophies. It is a measure of a person’s activities against a standard of behavior. By outlining basic rules of expected conduct, the code of ethics communicates these rules to all security officers including Hospital Security Officers. The manner in which personnel of a business conduct their activities has a direct effect on whether a business succeeds or falls. Hospital Security Officers are entrusted to protect persons and property from harm, and so by definition must possess a high degree of integrity and ethical standards. Ethical behavior is therefore a direct job function of Hospital Security Officers. ➢A published and public code of ethics increases the effectiveness and role of the Hospital Security Officer. ➢The code of ethics will help the security industry attract a better caliber of security officer. ➢The code of ethics will help create a professional environment in which to work, reducing turnover rates and increasing effectiveness. ➢ The code of ethics will enhance the way law enforcement agencies and the general public view private security. ➢The code of ethics will help protect people’s rights and reduce abuses of authority. CODE OF ETHICS FOR SECURITY OFFICERS In my capacity as a Hospital Security Officer hired to prevent, report and deter crime, I pledge: 1. To protect life and property; prevent and reduce crime committed against my employer/client’s business, or other organizations and institutions to which I am assigned; abide by the Constitution of the United States. 2. To carry out my duties with honesty and integrity and to maintain the highest moral principles. 3. To faithfully, diligently and dependably discharge my duties, and to uphold the laws, policies and procedures that protect the rights of others. 4. To discharge my duties truthfully, accurately and prudently without interference of personal feelings, prejudices, animosities or friendships to influence my judgments. 5. To report any violation of law or rule or regulation immediately to my supervisors. 6. To respect and protect information considered confidential and privileged by my employer or client, except where their interests are contrary to law or this Code of Ethics. 7. To cooperate with all recognized and responsible law enforcement agencies within their jurisdiction. 8. To accept no compensation, commission, gratuity, or other advantage without the knowledge and consent of my employer. 9. To conduct myself professionally at all times, and to perform my duties in a manner that reflects credit upon me, my employer and the security profession. 10. To continually improve my performance by seeking training and educational opportunities that better prepare me to carry out my security duties. SELECTED ETHICAL VIOLATIONS Failure to Report Violations Reporting ethical violations is an essential part of a security Guard’s job. Watching for and reporting ethical violations is part of protecting people and property. Unethical behavior is a threat to the well being of people and property. Reporting ethical violations is doing the job for which a Hospital Security Officer has been hired. Failing to report ethical violations compromises the entire security function. Companies should have carefully developed protocols for reporting suspected ethical violations. People have to trust the process, and the process must work. Discretion is a must. Violating Confidentiality What you see at work stays at work. Information is valuable property. Protecting property is a duty of a Hospital Security Officer. Keeping confidences comes with the job. Dishonesty There is no excuse for dishonesty of any sort by a Hospital Security Officer. Theft of property. There is never a legitimate reason for theft. No excuse will be accepted. “Unauthorized borrowing” is the same as stealing. Theft of services is theft. Theft of time is stealing. Sleeping on duty is theft. Leave abuse is stealing. Falsification is unethical and dishonest. Making false entries in the business records of a company is a crime. Falsely reporting that you made inspections when you did not is unethical. Falsely reporting on some records is theft. Destruction or Misuse of Property There is never a legitimate excuse for damaging or misusing property or equipment belonging to another. Impersonation Do not represent yourself as other than a Hospital Security Officer. Impersonation is unethical, and almost always counter productive. Hospital Security Officers need to be immediately and precisely identifiable as Security Officers. People need ready access to Hospital Security Officers, and must be aware of their presence. The idea that pretending to be a law enforcement Hospital Security Officer is helpful is an illusion. It is not true. Malpractice Abuse of authority and incompetence are each definite violation of ethics. Abuse of authority is deliberate wrongdoing. Incompetence is wrongdoing due to lack of skill. There is nothing that compromises security faster than bad security. Whether deliberate or incompetent, improper security operations compromise security, and can endanger the very people and property a Hospital Security Officers is hired to protect. Favoritism Hospital Security Officers are part of but yet slightly apart from their co-workers. Hospital Security Officers must avoid even the perception of subjectivity or favoritism. Alcohol and drugs The use of alcohol or drugs while on duty is absolutely prohibited. Hospital Security Officers are expected to be fully alert at all times when on duty. On-duty alcohol or drug use compromises safety, reduces response time, inhibits professional judgments, and compromises security. Bribes A Hospital Security Officer may only serve one “master.” No Hospital Security Officer may accept anything of value from anyone other than the employer for performing security services. Accepting bribes is a firing offense. Always and without exception. Gambling Gambling at work violates accepted ethical standards for Hospital Security Officer. Borrowing Money Borrowing money from, or lending money to, co-workers and employees is frowned upon. A debt creates at least a perception of undue influence, which can compromise a Hospital Security Officer even if the perception is not true. Harassment, Sexual and Otherwise People come to work to work. The law prohibits activities which makes working more difficult for illegitimate reasons, such as race, religion or sex. Conduct which is offensive to someone because of their race, religion, or sex has no place at work. It is not job-related, and people simply do not have to put up with it. Harassment, including sexual harassment, is a violation of civil rights laws. Harassment reduces productivity, and creates liabilities for employers. It is also hurtful to its victims, and against the law. Its reduction is therefore part of a Hospital Security Officers duty to protect people and property. Sexual Harassment Sexual Harassment is legally defined as any unwelcome sexual conduct or contact. Note that sexual harassment (like all harassment) is measured primarily by the effect of conduct on the victim. The “intent” of the actor is not important, it does not matter much that the person thought the conduct was “harmless.” Sexually harassing conduct can be open, such as coercing sex with a promise of promotion, or “grabbing” at employees. It can also be more subtle, such as jokes and verbal conduct, or too persistently trying to date someone who has said “no.” Join the United Federation LEOS-PBA Law Enforcement Officers Security & Police Benefit Association the true authority of Law Enforcement, Protective Service Officers, Special Police Officers, Security Police Officers, Nuclear Security Officers, K9 Handlers, Security Officers, Security Guards and Security Professionals nationwide. Contact us today @ 1-800-516-0094 or visit our website @ www.LEOSPBA.org Organizing: 1-800-516-0094 United Federation LEOS-PBA (202) 595-3510